GOP Nunes’ FBI ‘Bias’ Memo Trump Released Today Has Just Had Its Credibility Ruined

Trump released Devin Nunes’ secret memo detailing bias at the FBI today, but it is being torn apart and losing all of its hype. The memo is simply a partisan summary of FISA warrant applications that the public still has no access to.

But one of the biggest arguments of bias set out by Nunes in the memo has been fully debunked. Nunes completely mis-characterized James Comey’s testimony in 2017 and destroyed its own credibility as a result.

In the memo, Nunes claimed that James Comey testified in June 2017 that the entire Steele dossier was “salacious and unverified.” The excerpt from the memo where he claims Comey said this, is below;

 

What really happened, is that Comey was asked a question of whether the FBI had confirmed any criminal allegations in the Steele dossier, to which he refused to answer in an open setting:

BURR: In the public domain is this question of the “Steele dossier,” a document that has been around out in for over a year. I’m not sure when the FBI first took possession of it, but the media had it before you had it and we had it. At the time of your departure from the FBI, was the FBI able to confirm any criminal allegations contained in the Steele document?

COMEY: Mr. Chairman, I don’t think that’s a question I can answer in an open setting because it goes into the details of the investigation.

During that same testimony, Comey once again said Trump denied the “unverified and salacious parts” of the dossier:

COMEY: The president called me I believe shortly before he was inaugurated as a follow-up to our conversation, private conversation on January the 6th. He just wanted to reiterate his rejection of that allegation and talk about—- he’d thought about it more. And why he thought it wasn’t true. The verified — unverified and salacious parts.

Comey took great care to avoid fully discrediting the Steele dossier. Nunes had to lie in his memo about that because otherwise the entire argument of the memo falls apart. The fact is that the memo is just one big opinion piece that is easily discredited.

Trained hypnotist Scott Adams also points out that the memo is essentially just a collection of opinion, revealed by the language of the memo itself. “Three words from the Nunes memo you should interpret as opinion and not fact: Essential, desperate, and passionate.” Adams posted to social media.

Comments

comments total

SHARE
Author read by millions every month. I am biracial & a congenital amputee, which helps me see the world a little differently. You can find my published works by visiting my current home at theaventuras.com